CIC 471

Past Issues
CIC 470
CIC 469
CIC 468
CIC 467
CIC 466
CIC 465
CIC 464
CIC 463
CIC 462
CIC 461
CIC 460
CIC 459
CIC 458
CIC 457
CIC 456
CIC 455
CIC 454
CIC 453
CIC 452
CIC 451
CIC 450
CIC 449
CIC 448
CIC 447
CIC 446
CIC 445
CIC 444
CIC 443
CIC 442
CIC 441
CIC 440
CIC 439
CIC 438
CIC 437
CIC 436
CIC 435
CIC 434
CIC 433
CIC 432
CIC 431
CIC 430
CIC 429
CIC 428
CIC 427
CIC 426
CIC 425
CIC 424
CIC 423
CIC 422
CIC 421
CIC 420
CIC 419
CIC 418
CIC 417
CIC 416
CIC 415
CIC 414
CIC 413
CIC 412
CIC 411
CIC 410
CIC 409
CIC 408
CIC 407
CIC 406
CIC 405
CIC 404
CIC 403
CIC 402
CIC 401
CIC 400
CIC 399
CIC 398
CIC 397
CIC 396
CIC 395
CIC 394
CIC 393
CIC 392
CIC 391
CIC 390
CIC 389
CIC 388
CIC 387
CIC 386
CIC 385
CIC 384
CIC 383
CIC 382
CIC 381
CIC 380
CIC 379
CIC 378
CIC 377
CIC 375
CIC 374
CIC 373
CIC 372
CIC 371
CIC 370
CIC 369
CIC 368
CIC 367
CIC 366
CIC 365
CIC 364
CIC 363
CIC 362
CIC 361
CIC 360
CIC 359
CIC 358
CIC 357
CIC 356
CIC 355
CIC 354
CIC 353
CIC 352
CIC 351
CIC 350
CIC 349
CIC 348
CIC 347
CIC 346
CIC 345
CIC 344
CIC 343
CIC 342
CIC 341
CIC 340
CIC 339
CIC 338
CIC 337
CIC 336
CIC 335
CIC 334
CIC 333
CIC 332
CIC 331
CIC 330
CIC 329
CIC 328
CIC 327
CIC 326
CIC 325
CIC 324
CIC 323
CIC 322
CIC 321
CIC 320
CIC 319
CIC 318
CIC 317
CIC 316
CIC 315
CIC 314
CIC 313
CIC 312
CIC 311
CIC 310
CIC 309
CIC 308
CIC 307
CIC 306
CIC 305
CIC 304
CIC 303
CIC 302
CIC 301
CIC 300
CIC 299
CIC 298
CIC 297
CIC 296
CIC 295
CIC 294
CIC 293
CIC 292
CIC 291
CIC 290
CIC 289
CIC 288
CIC 287
CIC 286
CIC 285
CIC 284
CIC 283
CIC 282
CIC 281
CIC 280
CIC 279
CIC 278
CIC 277
CIC 276
CIC 275
CIC 274
CIC 273
CIC 272
CIC 271
CIC 270
CIC 269
CIC 268
CIC 267
CIC 266
CIC 265
CIC 264
CIC 263
CIC 262
CIC 261
CIC 260
CIC 259
CIC 258
CIC 257
CIC 256
CIC 255
CIC 254
CIC 253
CIC 252
CIC 251
CIC 250
CIC 249
CIC 248
CIC 247
CIC 246
CIC 245
CIC 244
CIC 243
CIC 242
CIC 241
CIC 240
CIC 239
CIC 238
CIC 237
CIC 236
CIC 235
CIC 234
CIC 233
CIC 232
CIC 231
CIC 230
CIC 229
CIC 228
CIC 227
CIC 226
CIC 225
CIC 224
CIC 223
CIC 222
CIC 221
CIC 220
CIC 219
CIC 218
CIC 217
CIC 216
CIC 215
CIC 214
CIC 213
CIC 212
CIC 211
CIC 210
CIC 209
CIC 208
CIC 207
CIC 206
CIC 205
CIC 204
CIC 203
CIC 202
CIC 201
CIC 200
CIC 199
CIC 198
CIC 197
CIC 196
CIC 195
CIC 194
CIC 193
CIC 192
CIC 191
CIC 190
CIC 189
CIC 188
CIC 187
CIC 186
CIC 185
CIC 184
CIC 183
CIC 182
CIC 181
CIC 180
CIC 179
CIC 178
CIC 177
CIC 176
CIC 175
CIC 174
CIC 173
CIC 172
CIC 171
CIC 170
CIC 169
CIC 168
CIC 167
CIC 166
CIC 165
CIC 164
CIC 163
CIC 162
CIC 161
CIC 160
CIC 159
CIC 158
CIC 157
CIC 156
CIC 155
CIC 154
CIC 153
CIC 152
CIC 151
CIC 150
CIC 149
CIC 148
CIC 147
CIC 146
CIC 145
CIC 144
CIC 143
CIC 142
CIC 141
CIC 140
CIC 139
CIC 138
CIC 137
CIC 136
CIC 135
CIC 134
CIC 133
CIC 132
CIC 131
CIC 130
CIC 129
CIC 128
CIC 127
CIC 126
CIC 125
CIC 124
CIC 123
CIC 122
CIC 121
CIC 120
CIC 119
CIC 118
CIC 117
CIC 116
CIC 115
CIC 114
CIC 113
CIC 112
CIC 111
CIC 110
CIC 109
CIC 108
CIC 107
CIC 106
CIC 105
CIC 104
CIC 103
CIC 102
CIC 101
CIC 100
CIC 99
CIC 98
CIC 97
CIC 96
CIC 95
CIC 94
CIC 93
CIC 92
CIC 91
CIC 90
CIC 89
CIC 88
CIC 87
CIC 86
CIC 85
CIC 84
CIC 83
CIC 82
CIC 81
CIC 80
CIC 79
CIC 78
CIC 77
CIC 76
CIC 75
CIC 74
CIC 73
CIC 72
CIC 71
CIC 70
CIC 69
CIC 68
CIC 67
CIC 66
CIC 65
CIC 64
CIC 63
CIC 62
CIC 61
CIC 60
CIC 59
CIC 58
CIC 57
CIC 56
CIC 55
CIC 54
CIC 53
CIC 52
CIC 51
CIC 50
CIC 49
CIC 48
CIC 47
CIC 46
CIC 45
CIC 44
CIC 43
CIC 42
CIC 41
CIC 40
CIC 39
CIC 38
CIC 37
CIC 36
CIC 35
CIC 34
CIC 33
CIC 32
CIC 31
CIC 30
CIC 29
CIC 28
CIC 27
CIC 26
CIC 25
CIC 24
CIC 23
CIC 22
CIC 21
CIC 20
CIC 19
CIC 18
CIC 17
CIC 16
CIC 15
CIC 14
CIC 13
CIC 12
CIC 11
CIC 10
CIC 9
CIC 8
CIC 7
CIC 6
CIC 5
CIC 4
CIC 3
CIC 2
CIC 1

Short Rounds

Caepio's Gold

Quintus Servilius Caepio (c. 145-post 95 BC) was the scion of a great Roman family, his father and two uncles all having served as consul, as had his grandfather, great-grandfather, and great-great-grandfather.  Naturally, with such an aristocratic background, he too did well in politics, serving as praetor about 110 BC, and then governor of Further Spain for two years, winning a triumph in 108 BC for the defeat of the Lusitanians.

Elected consul for 106 BC, at a time when massive hordes of barbaric Cimbri and Teutones were threatening to descend upon Italy from both sides of the Alps, Caepio was given an army and sent to command in Narbonnensis, what is now Provence.  Now just north of Narbonnensis, in Aquitania, lived the Gallic Tectosagae, who had allied themselves with the invading Cimbri.  Caepio conducted a successful campaign against them, in the process capturing their capital, Tolosa (modern Toulouse).  The plunder from Tolosa was impressive, given –probably exaggeratedly – as over 50,000 ingots of gold and 10,000 of silver, each of 15 pounds.  Naturally, the loot belonged to the Roman people, and Caepio duly had it shipped to the capital in two convoys.  Oddly, only the convoy carrying the silver made it to Rome, that moving the gold having been set upon by bandits; at the time the bandits were generally regarded as having been in the employ of none other than Caepio himself, a belief that persists.

Meanwhile, of course, the danger from the Cimbri remained.  Although his consulship expired at the end of 106 BC, Caepio's command was prorogued as proconsul, while the Senate dispatched one of the newly elected consuls, Gnaeus Mallius Maximus, with a second army.  Unfortunately, Mallius's very existence irked Caepio's aristocratic blood, for the consul was a so-called "New Man," that is one who had no consuls in his ancestry, a jumped-up commoner as it were.  So Caepio refused to cooperate with Mallius against the invaders, despite being urged to do so by his subordinates and even his troops.  The outcome was predictable; at Arausio (Orange) on October 5, 105 BC, the Cimbri defeated both Roman armies, one at a time.  The blow to the Republic was horrific, with reports that as many as 80,000 troops perished, among them two sons of Mallius, and 40,000 camp-followers, with just ten men escaping.  Although the numbers are certainly greatly inflated, it was a critical blow to Roman power.

Caepio survived the battle.  But he was deprived of his command by the people's assembly and forcibly retired to private life, while the great Gaius Marius cleaned up the mess.  Ten years later, in 95 BC, Caepio was finally brought to trial for his misconduct by one of the people's Tribunes.  Although the aristocratic faction rallied to his side, he was convicted, and a ruinous fine was imposed, apparently in the hope of unearthing all that missing gold.  On top of that, Caepio was imprisoned for a time.  Later escaping, he fled to Smyrna, in Asia, where he lived out his life in great luxury, as befitted the man who had swiped all that gold.

 

Always a Bridesmaid . . . .

Wilhelm of Urach (1869-1928), scion of a junior branch of the Royal House of Wurttemberg, has a unique distinction -- he probably holds the world's record for the most thrones that he almost held.

Typical of his family, Wilhelm was a soldier.  In the early 1890s he was commissioned in the Wurttemberg Army, one of the four branches of the Imperial German Army.  By the outbreak of World War I, in August of 1914, he was a generalmajor in command of the 26th Infantry Division, of the XIII (Royal Wurttemberg) Army Corps.  Wilhelm campaigned at the head of his division in the West in the summer and autumn of 1914, taking part in the invasion of France and Belgium, of which his sister-in-law was queen.  Transferred east in November, over the next year Wilhelm and his division took part in the German capture of Poland.  In October and November of 1915, they helped overrun Serbia, before being sent West again.  By December they were ensconced on the Western Front again, at first in the Ypres Sector, but later transferred south.  During the Battle of the Somme in 1916, Wilhelm's division was largely destroyed holding the Schwaben Redoubt.

Although the division had done well in some notably fierce fighting, on January 5, 1917, shortly after it was had been pulled out of the line to be rebuilt, Wilhelm retired from the army.  As he was only 48 at the time, and had performed well under fire, this seems curious.  Perhaps he had decided the war was no longer worth fighting, or, perhaps his performance was not considered optimal by the Chief of the Great General Staff, Paul von Hindenburg, himself no spring chicken, having been born in 1847!   Or perhaps Wilhelm had decided that he might want to pursue other career opportunities.  Whatever the case, his retirement effectively ended his military career, but some opportunities did indeed open up..

Like most aristos, Wilhelm held a number of titles.  He was born Prince of Urach and Count of Wurttemberg, and succeeded to the title Duke of Urach when he was only 4, upon the untimely death of his father.  In addition, on five separate occasions Wilhelm might have ended up with a real throne.

  • 1911:  The reigning prince of Monaco, Albert I (r. 1889-1922), had one son, Louis (r.  1922-1949) who would naturally assume the title upon his father's death.  But Louis, who served as an officer in the French Army and eventually rose to general of brigade,  had no legitimate children.  His closest legitimate male relative was a cousin,  none other than Duke Wilhelm, who was the son of Prince Albert's paternal aunt.  Although Wilhelm had actually been raised mostly in Monaco, the notion of a German officer as prince there was hardly pleasing to France.  Under French pressure, Monaco enacted a law in 1911 legitimating Prince Louis' only child, Charlotte, his daughter by a cabaret singer with a past whom he'd had an affair with while serving in North Africa.  Then, in 1918, when the validity of the act of legitimization was challenged, Prince Albert adopted Charlotte, his granddaughter, under terms of a different law.  In addition, France and Monaco concluded a treaty requiring that future princes of Monaco be Monegasque or French citizens, and have approval of the French government.  Barred from inheriting, Wilhelm shortly renounced his rights in favor of some distantly-related French cousins.
  • 1913:  Wilhelm was one of several princes considered for the throne of Albania, being supported by Roman Catholic tribes in the north of the new country, but the honor went to Prince William of Wied, who served as Prince of Albania from March 7, 1914 to September 3, 1914, before fleeing to safety abroad.
  • 1917:  Despite the fact that the Great War was not going quite Germany's way, the extraordinarily ambitions Kaiser sounded out Duke Wilhelm about the possibility becoming Duke of Lorraine after the war was over.
  • 1918:  Delegates to Lithuania's constituent assembly elected Duke Wilhelm king of the newly independent country under the name Mindaugas II on July 11th.  Although he accepted the honor, he was never actually crowned, as the German Emperor, legally his overlord, declared the election invalid, and the offer was eventually withdrawn. 
  • 1921:  King Wilhelm II of Wurttemberg died without a direct male heir.  Although Duke Wilhelm was the senior male member of the House of Wurttemberg, because his great-grandmother had not been of sufficiently blue blood (she was only a baroness), he was barred from succeeding, not that it mattered, since Wurttemberg had become a state of the Weimar Republic in 1918.

 


© 1998 - 2019 StrategyWorld.com. All rights Reserved.
StrategyWorld.com, StrategyPage.com, FYEO, For Your Eyes Only and Al Nofi's CIC are all trademarks of StrategyWorld.com
Privacy Policy