CIC 477

Past Issues
CIC 476
CIC 475
CIC 474
CIC 473
CIC 472
CIC 471
CIC 470
CIC 469
CIC 468
CIC 467
CIC 466
CIC 465
CIC 464
CIC 463
CIC 462
CIC 461
CIC 460
CIC 459
CIC 458
CIC 457
CIC 456
CIC 455
CIC 454
CIC 453
CIC 452
CIC 451
CIC 450
CIC 449
CIC 448
CIC 447
CIC 446
CIC 445
CIC 444
CIC 443
CIC 442
CIC 441
CIC 440
CIC 439
CIC 438
CIC 437
CIC 436
CIC 435
CIC 434
CIC 433
CIC 432
CIC 431
CIC 430
CIC 429
CIC 428
CIC 427
CIC 426
CIC 425
CIC 424
CIC 423
CIC 422
CIC 421
CIC 420
CIC 419
CIC 418
CIC 417
CIC 416
CIC 415
CIC 414
CIC 413
CIC 412
CIC 411
CIC 410
CIC 409
CIC 408
CIC 407
CIC 406
CIC 405
CIC 404
CIC 403
CIC 402
CIC 401
CIC 400
CIC 399
CIC 398
CIC 397
CIC 396
CIC 395
CIC 394
CIC 393
CIC 392
CIC 391
CIC 390
CIC 389
CIC 388
CIC 387
CIC 386
CIC 385
CIC 384
CIC 383
CIC 382
CIC 381
CIC 380
CIC 379
CIC 378
CIC 377
CIC 375
CIC 374
CIC 373
CIC 372
CIC 371
CIC 370
CIC 369
CIC 368
CIC 367
CIC 366
CIC 365
CIC 364
CIC 363
CIC 362
CIC 361
CIC 360
CIC 359
CIC 358
CIC 357
CIC 356
CIC 355
CIC 354
CIC 353
CIC 352
CIC 351
CIC 350
CIC 349
CIC 348
CIC 347
CIC 346
CIC 345
CIC 344
CIC 343
CIC 342
CIC 341
CIC 340
CIC 339
CIC 338
CIC 337
CIC 336
CIC 335
CIC 334
CIC 333
CIC 332
CIC 331
CIC 330
CIC 329
CIC 328
CIC 327
CIC 326
CIC 325
CIC 324
CIC 323
CIC 322
CIC 321
CIC 320
CIC 319
CIC 318
CIC 317
CIC 316
CIC 315
CIC 314
CIC 313
CIC 312
CIC 311
CIC 310
CIC 309
CIC 308
CIC 307
CIC 306
CIC 305
CIC 304
CIC 303
CIC 302
CIC 301
CIC 300
CIC 299
CIC 298
CIC 297
CIC 296
CIC 295
CIC 294
CIC 293
CIC 292
CIC 291
CIC 290
CIC 289
CIC 288
CIC 287
CIC 286
CIC 285
CIC 284
CIC 283
CIC 282
CIC 281
CIC 280
CIC 279
CIC 278
CIC 277
CIC 276
CIC 275
CIC 274
CIC 273
CIC 272
CIC 271
CIC 270
CIC 269
CIC 268
CIC 267
CIC 266
CIC 265
CIC 264
CIC 263
CIC 262
CIC 261
CIC 260
CIC 259
CIC 258
CIC 257
CIC 256
CIC 255
CIC 254
CIC 253
CIC 252
CIC 251
CIC 250
CIC 249
CIC 248
CIC 247
CIC 246
CIC 245
CIC 244
CIC 243
CIC 242
CIC 241
CIC 240
CIC 239
CIC 238
CIC 237
CIC 236
CIC 235
CIC 234
CIC 233
CIC 232
CIC 231
CIC 230
CIC 229
CIC 228
CIC 227
CIC 226
CIC 225
CIC 224
CIC 223
CIC 222
CIC 221
CIC 220
CIC 219
CIC 218
CIC 217
CIC 216
CIC 215
CIC 214
CIC 213
CIC 212
CIC 211
CIC 210
CIC 209
CIC 208
CIC 207
CIC 206
CIC 205
CIC 204
CIC 203
CIC 202
CIC 201
CIC 200
CIC 199
CIC 198
CIC 197
CIC 196
CIC 195
CIC 194
CIC 193
CIC 192
CIC 191
CIC 190
CIC 189
CIC 188
CIC 187
CIC 186
CIC 185
CIC 184
CIC 183
CIC 182
CIC 181
CIC 180
CIC 179
CIC 178
CIC 177
CIC 176
CIC 175
CIC 174
CIC 173
CIC 172
CIC 171
CIC 170
CIC 169
CIC 168
CIC 167
CIC 166
CIC 165
CIC 164
CIC 163
CIC 162
CIC 161
CIC 160
CIC 159
CIC 158
CIC 157
CIC 156
CIC 155
CIC 154
CIC 153
CIC 152
CIC 151
CIC 150
CIC 149
CIC 148
CIC 147
CIC 146
CIC 145
CIC 144
CIC 143
CIC 142
CIC 141
CIC 140
CIC 139
CIC 138
CIC 137
CIC 136
CIC 135
CIC 134
CIC 133
CIC 132
CIC 131
CIC 130
CIC 129
CIC 128
CIC 127
CIC 126
CIC 125
CIC 124
CIC 123
CIC 122
CIC 121
CIC 120
CIC 119
CIC 118
CIC 117
CIC 116
CIC 115
CIC 114
CIC 113
CIC 112
CIC 111
CIC 110
CIC 109
CIC 108
CIC 107
CIC 106
CIC 105
CIC 104
CIC 103
CIC 102
CIC 101
CIC 100
CIC 99
CIC 98
CIC 97
CIC 96
CIC 95
CIC 94
CIC 93
CIC 92
CIC 91
CIC 90
CIC 89
CIC 88
CIC 87
CIC 86
CIC 85
CIC 84
CIC 83
CIC 82
CIC 81
CIC 80
CIC 79
CIC 78
CIC 77
CIC 76
CIC 75
CIC 74
CIC 73
CIC 72
CIC 71
CIC 70
CIC 69
CIC 68
CIC 67
CIC 66
CIC 65
CIC 64
CIC 63
CIC 62
CIC 61
CIC 60
CIC 59
CIC 58
CIC 57
CIC 56
CIC 55
CIC 54
CIC 53
CIC 52
CIC 51
CIC 50
CIC 49
CIC 48
CIC 47
CIC 46
CIC 45
CIC 44
CIC 43
CIC 42
CIC 41
CIC 40
CIC 39
CIC 38
CIC 37
CIC 36
CIC 35
CIC 34
CIC 33
CIC 32
CIC 31
CIC 30
CIC 29
CIC 28
CIC 27
CIC 26
CIC 25
CIC 24
CIC 23
CIC 22
CIC 21
CIC 20
CIC 19
CIC 18
CIC 17
CIC 16
CIC 15
CIC 14
CIC 13
CIC 12
CIC 11
CIC 10
CIC 9
CIC 8
CIC 7
CIC 6
CIC 5
CIC 4
CIC 3
CIC 2
CIC 1

Short Rounds

The French General's Dog

On March 5, 1811, a combined force of Spanish and British troops attempting to break the French investment of Cadiz was ambushed near the town of Chiclana, leading to the Battle of Barossa.  Although an Allied tactical victory, the battle had no effect on the siege, which would continue into the following year.

After the battle most of the wounded from both sides languished on the field through the night and into the following day.  Among them was French General de brigade Pierre Guillaume Chaudron-Rousseau, who had led a desperate attack by some grenadiers.

Now the general had a white poodle, which he had left behind in his quarters when his troops moved out to take part in the battle.  When the French troops streamed back to their camp, the general was naturally not among them.  Wondering what had happened to his master, the poodle went to look for him.  Amazingly, despite the onset of darkness and a field littered with dead and wounded men and animals, the dog found the general.  When burial parties arrived the following day, the dog was found beside his master's body.  He accompanied the body after it had been collected, and while arrangements were being made for a proper burial.  When the general was finally interred, the dog lay down on the grave.  He would probably have perished there were it not for the kindness of British Lt. Gen. Sir Thomas Graham, who had commanded the troops that had slain his master. 

Graham, who had ordered that Chaudron-Rousseau be given a proper military burial, in deference to his rank (common soldiers were usually just dumped in a pit), approached the dog.  Speaking kindly to the animal, the general coaxed him from the grave.  Renamed Fuss, the dog became the general's close companion.  Fuss followed his new master throughout the wars and  later settled with Graham at his home in Perthshire, where he died many years later. 

Despite his long association with Sir Thomas, however, Fuss never became a proper Briton, remaining, in the general's words, always "A Frenchman and an ass."

 

Charles King

By the outbreak of the Civil War the Kings of Massachusetts, New York, and later Wisconsin were among the most distinguished of American families.  As a young man Richard King (1718-1775), a prosperous Massachusetts farmer and merchant, had taken part as a volunteer in the Louisbourg Expedition of 1748.   His son, Rufus (1755-1827) served as a militia officer for a time during the American Revolution, rising to major, represented Massachusetts in Congress under the Articles of Confederation and was a member of the Constitutional Convention, before going on to become a senator from New York.  Rufus’ son Charles (b. 1789), had served as a volunteer in the War of 1812, and then pursued a career in journalism  and politics before becoming President of Columbia University in 1848.  Charles’ son, Rufus (b. 1814), had graduated from West Point (1833), and later went on to a career in business and politics, first in New York, where he was for several years adjutant general, and then in Wisconsin

At the outbreak of the Civil War Rufus King was the U.S. minister-designate to the Papal States, but forewent his foreign posting to become a brigadier general, first in the Wisconsin militia and then in the volunteers, while his eldest son, Rufus King, Jr. (b. 1838), went off to war as a private in the famed 7th New York Militia, and shortly received a direct commission as a lieutenant in the Regular Army. 

During the war elder Rufus King formed what would later become known as the "Iron Brigade," but otherwise had a lackluster military career; while commanding a division during the Second Bull Run Campaign he did so poorly he was charged with dereliction of duty and shortly relegated to administrative and court martial service until he resumed his posting in Rome in 1863, and later helped arrange the return of John Wilkes Booth's co-conspirator John Surratt to the United States.  The younger Rufus served as an artillery officer until the end of the war, rising to battery commander before leaving the Army with a brevet as a major.

But there was a third King in the army during the war, for the younger Rufus had a brother, Charles (b. 1844).  When he was just 12, young Charles served as a guidon bearer in the Wisconsin militia.  Only 16 when the Civil War broke out, Charles briefly served as a drummer and orderly in his father’s brigade, until he won an appointment to West Point in 1862, about the time his father finally went off to be Minister to the Vatican.

Charles graduated from the Military Academy in 1866, and was commissioned in the artillery.  In early 1870 he was promoted to first lieutenant, and later that year managed a transfer to the 5th Cavalry.  The youngest King saw extensive service on the frontier, notably during the Great Sioux War, during which he was wounded at Slim Buttes (September 9–10, 1876).   His wound making it difficult to perform some duties, Charles was assigned as regimental adjutant, but he retired for disability as a captain in 1879.

Meanwhile, Charles King had developed an interesting avocation.  Hobbies were by no means unknown among officers in the frontier army.  Duty in the west was often mind-numbing; Hollywood to the contrary, Indian wars were quite rare.  Officers could spend years on isolated posts with almost literally nothing to do; between April of 1865 and August of 1898, most of which he spent on the frontier, Arthur MacArthur never once saw action.  To relieve the boredom some officers took to drink, and the number who died due to complications from booze was very high.  Others, among them some of the most noted Indian fighters, cultivated vegetable patches or flower gardens.  Some undertook scientific or academic pursuits, exploring local resources, researching the local plant and animal life, or doing ethnological or linguistic studies among the Indians.  Although he saw more action than most, Charles King began to write fiction.

Well before leaving the Army, King had begun to publish occasional short stories and novels, usually based on people and events he encountered in the course of his military career, which he had carefully noted in his diary 

Once having left the Army, King became a full time professional writer, though taking time out to serve a hitch as a brigadier general of volunteers during the Spanish-American War, served under fire in the Philippine War, and was later Adjutant General of Wisconsin during World War I.

Altogether King, wrote 250 short stories and 38 novels about military life in the west, plus 34 other books, both fiction and non-fiction – 27 of his novels went into multiple printings – not to mention scripts for stage plays, Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show, and several of early movies.  Reportedly his royalties occasionally topped $20,000 a year, an enormous sum for the times.

Several of King's works attracted favorable critical comment as "serious literature," and one critic called him “The first novelist of the American army.”  His adventure stories inspired a generation of imitators, among them Edgar Rice Boroughs, the creator of Tarzan, and later inspired a number of notable films, including John Ford, who populated his cavalry pictures with stock figures from King's works, such as the lovable, and whiskey loving, Irish sergeant, the tough, but fair officer, the green West Pointer, and so forth

In the reorganization of the National Guard following World War I, some bureaucrats in the Army decided to remove King from the list of officers eligible for duty.  Hearing of this, the personnel of the Wisconsin National Guard protested, and won the ear of the Army's Deputy Chief of Staff, James G. Harbord, a tough veteran of the Indian Wars who had commanded the 2nd Division at Belleau Wood.  Hobard concurred with the Wisconsinites.  Observing that King’s books had inspired him and many others to join the army, he promptly had the general restored to active reserve status.

Charles King died in 1933, still serving as Adjutant General of Wisconsin, well over 70 years after having first donned the uniform.

Note: Those interested in reading some of King's work might have a look at The Colonel's Christmas Dinner and Other Stories (Philadelphia: 1894 ) or A Wounded Name - Charles King (New York & London: 1898) or, for Kindle owners, The Essential Charles King Collection

 


© 1998 - 2021 StrategyWorld.com. All rights Reserved.
StrategyWorld.com, StrategyPage.com, FYEO, For Your Eyes Only and Al Nofi's CIC are all trademarks of StrategyWorld.com
Privacy Policy