Rwanda: Peace, Except for One Bunch of Rebels

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September 19, 2005: Peace or continued war? Burundi's FNL rebels have sent conflicting signals in the past-- and they are doing it again. The reason may be quite simple: the FNL is composed of competing factions. On September 14 the FNL attacked "several tragets" near the capital. On September 15 FNL rebels attacked a military base in the Gihosha region (north of the capital). The FNL group used grenades and rocket-propelled grenades in the attack. One person was killed. Later on the same day an FNL spokesman said the FNL was willing to discuss peace. The FNL, however, rejected negotiations with the Burundian government. The FNL spokesman said the group would discuss peace with (quote) "representatives of the Hutu, Tutsi and Twa ethnic groups." (The Twa are also called the Pygmies.) The FNL (a Hutu rebel group) does not want to legitimate its Hutu rivals who have joined the government and participated in electoral politics. The fact is, the FNL missed a political opportunity rival Burundian Hutus accepted, and that fact is finally dawning on the FNL holdouts.

September 13, 2005: The FNL refused to hold peace talks with the new government.

September 2, 2005: Battles with FNL rebels continue, with five rebels and one soldier killed on the outskirts of the capital.

August 31, 2005: The new government was installed, containing Hutu and Tutsi ministers. This government is the result of the peace deal between Hutu and Tutsi.

August  20, 2005: Former Hutu rebel leader, Pierre Nkurunziza, was selected as president of Burundi. Nkurunziza's mother was Tutsi.

 

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