Iraq: Blood Is Thicker Than Religion

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May 10, 2007: U.S. commanders have made deals with Shia militias to help provide security for Shia neighborhoods. The Sunni terrorists now concentrate in killing as many Shia civilians as possible, rather than risk losing suicide bombers trying to attack military or government targets. Similar deals have been made with Sunni Arab tribal leaders, to try and shut down the suicide bomb factories and safe houses in Sunni Arab neighborhoods. The remaining Sunni Arabs are falling all over themselves trying to be nice to the Americans.

American intelligence tracks hundreds of indicators in Iraq, and they are all showing that the Sunni Arab terrorists, and their al Qaeda allies, are fading away. It's a trend even the terrorists appear to be aware of, as the word on the street is that morale is low, and the terrorist organizations have to offer more money to get bomb builders, planters and scouts for the roadside bomb operations. The bomb business is getting more dangerous, what with more people using their cell phones to call the cops when they see bombs being built, transported or planted. The suicide bombers, however, are getting a boost from American politicians opposed to the war in Iraq, and the attempts to get American troops pulled out. The number two guy in al Qaeda has recently boasted about this support, in a video distributed on the Internet. Such support for the enemy is nothing new in politics. In all of America's wars, the opposition party tried to use a war as a way to discredit the part in power. You can look it up. But that won't save Iraq's Sunni Arabs. If American troops left tomorrow, there would soon be a massive, and very ugly, campaign against the remaining Sunni Arab community (more than half of them have already fled the country.) Even the UN has noticed, and deduced that this is the largest refugee crises in the Middle East since Israel was founded (and over a million Jews and Arabs were driven from their homes in Palestine and throughout the region). The Iraqi Sunni Arabs don't get much sympathy, even from fellow Sunni Arabs. Saddam Hussein got enthusiastic support from his fellow Sunni Arabs, for over three decades, as they looted the country and murdered hundreds of thousands of Kurds and Shia Arabs (who were 80 percent of the population.) Right at the end of the 2003 invasion, reports began to appear revealing Saddam's "Plan B" in case a foreign invasion was successful. What's been going on for the past four years is that plan being carried out, a terror operation aimed at putting the Sunni Arabs back in control. Over 50,000 Iraqi civilians have been killed by Sunni Arab terrorists in that time, and all the Sunni Arabs have to show for it is a serious effort to drive all Sunni Arabs from Iraq. Iraqis understand, better than the Americans, that the Sunni Arabs running the terrorism operations are fanatical, and feel they have nothing to lose by continuing the killing. Many of the terrorists used to be enforcers for Saddam, and already have blood on their hands. The Iraqi government has consistently refused to offer amnesty to most of these killers, so the only solution is to kill them all. Each month, a small percentage will lose heart and flee the country, but it will be five years or more before all the Sunni Arab terrorists are killed or arrested.

There's been a shift in attitude, throughout the Sunni Arab world, towards the Iraqi Shia Arabs that control the Iraqi government. Although the Shia Arabs feel an affinity with Shia Iran, the ancient (we're talking thousands of years here) Arab fear of the Iranians makes it possible for Shia and Sunni Arabs to make deals. And that's what Saudi Arabia, and the other Sunni Arab Gulf States, are doing with Iraq. Saudi Arabia sees Iran as the neighborhood bully, and Iraq as an Arab, not an Iranian, ally. Part of this came about because of the pro-Iran Shia Arab militias in Iraq. Shia Arab politicians in Iraq now tend to feel they are expendable to the Iranians, who are, quite naturally, more concerned with taking care of Iran, than Iraq, in all of this. Blood is thicker than religion.

 

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