Sea Transportation: The Super Supply Ship

Archives

December
12, 2006:
The U.S. Navy has ordered the 9th of 12 T-AKE replenishment ships.
These 40,000 ton, 689 foot long ships replace Vietnam war era dry cargo,
ammunition and oiler supply ships. Built to civilian ship standards, they
enable American shipyards to retain a non-warship building capability. The
T-AKEs carry a crew of 124, nearly all civilians. The T-AKE can carry
everything a warship at sea would need (food, including frozen stuff, spare
parts, munitions, petroleum products and all manner of goods). The T-AKEs can
cover over 800 kilometers a day, and spend most of their time chasing after
U.S. warships, delivering needed supplies. Each T-AKE can carry 2,400 tons of
fuels, and has 1.1 million cubic feet of hold space for dry cargo (including
ammunition). The fourth T-AKE will enter service this month, with the twelfth
ship of the class being available in 2010. The navy will still have oilers
(tankers) for supplying most of the petroleum needed. But the ability to carry
some petroleum products simply makes the T-AKE more flexible, and useful.

 


Article Archive

Sea Transportation: Current 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 1999 


X

ad
0
30

Help Keep Us Soaring

We need your help! Our subscription base has slowly been dwindling. We need your help in reversing that trend. We would like to add 30 new subscribers this month.

Each month we count on your subscriptions or contributions. You can support us in the following ways:

  1. Make sure you spread the word about us. Two ways to do that are to like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.
  2. Subscribe to our daily newsletter. We’ll send the news to your email box, and you don’t have to come to the site unless you want to read columns or see photos.
  3. You can contribute to the health of StrategyPage. A contribution is not a donation that you can deduct at tax time, but a form of crowdfunding. We store none of your information when you contribute..
Subscribe   Contribute   Close