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Surface Forces: Dutch SIGMA in Indonesia
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November 27, 2007: The Indonesian Navy has received the two of four SIGMA class corvettes from the Dutch builders in the last few months. These ships displace 1,700 tons, are 281 feet long and have a crew of 80. Armament consists of a 76mm gun, two 20mm guns, eight Mistral anti-aircraft missiles, six torpedoes and four anti-ship missiles (either French Exocet or Chinese C802). There are radars for navigation, surveillance air defense, as well as sonar. These ships can stay at sea for about 28 days at a time, and cost about $490 million each.

 

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trenchsol       11/27/2007 9:22:27 AM
I wonder why a lot of corvettes have 76 mm main guns. The ships are big enough to pack 120 mm or 127 mm rapid fire gun. In fact they used to couple decades ago. As a matter of fact British corvettes still have 114 mm gun. I remember that one of them used it against land targets at Falklands. Gun rounds are still much cheaper than anti-ship missiles for low value targets.

DG

 
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WarNerd    why 76mm   11/27/2007 10:14:27 AM
The OTO-Melara 76 mm gun is probably one of the best and most widely used fully automatic multirole guns ever developed with a mix of characteristics that many see as the best combine of range and punch for shore bombardment with a high rate of fire (80 rpm) for anti-missile defense. And with 40+ years of operational history and 100's of units deployed in almost every western navy probably has very few bugs left.
 
Larger guns are better at ship-to-ship and ship-to-shore bombardment but lack the rate of fire needed for the anti-missile role.  Smaller guns (40mm & 57mm) are better for anti-missile, but lack the punch needed for bombardment.
 
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eldnah       11/27/2007 11:39:30 AM
What am I missing? The US Navy planned a series of corvettes, LCS's, that displaced about 50% more and are about a hundred feet longer than the Sigmas. The LCSs were to cost about $200 million and were canceled when the price reached about $400 million apiece. Now we find in the above article that the Indonesian corvettes cost about $490 million each. Are the Indonesians being taken for a ride or are the getting better ships? Their nation is an archipelago with a huge littoral. Is it possible that the original $200 million projected cost for the LCS was all nonsense just to get the project approved? Should the USN just license build Sigmas or another off the shelf design. Naaah, the USN would probably so modify the design that American version would cost twice as much as the original.
 
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doggtag    ...and what's funny about the LCS is...   11/27/2007 12:11:08 PM
...its/their main gun was supposed to be the Bofors-derived 57mm All Target Gun (built under license by UDLP/BAE).
 
Perhaps that was on the grounds of being ammo compatible with the secondary guns of the DD(X) {close range anti surface, AA, CIWS roles}.
Still, the 57mm gun had a range of 17km in the surface support role with its High Capacity Entended Range round.
 
And yet, the 76/62 Naval Gun offers not only an improved range HE-MOM High Explosive Multi Option Munition supposed to reach out to 20km,
but alse the guided subcaliber Davide/DART munition.
 
Doesn't stop there, because UDLP already had experience with a guided 60mm round back in the late 1980s-early 1990s,
and the Bushmaster 50mm gun is the latest weapon slated to expirement with course correcting/adjustable trajectory shells.
 
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NATO OF-2 RN    British Corvettes   11/27/2007 12:28:05 PM
There are no British corvettes, haven't been for decades, and there have never been any with 114mm guns.  The only British warships to carry the '4.5' have been frigates and destroyers, and it was they who conducted naval-gunfire-support in the Falklands.
 
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trenchsol       11/27/2007 10:33:12 PM
US Navy used term frigate for light cruiser size ships. That left escort ships smaller then destroyers to be classified as corvettes. British Type 21 were small ships armed with Seacat AA missiles, they, maybe, might be considered to weak for frigates.

DG

 
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trenchsol       11/27/2007 10:48:40 PM
Has anyone actually managed to destroy an anti-ship missile with 76 mm gun ? Does it work in real life ?



 
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gf0012-aust       11/27/2007 10:57:56 PM

US Navy used term frigate for light cruiser size ships.
The original definition of frigate was a vessel that was between a corvette and a destroyer.
The original destroyer however was an iteration of the torpedo boat. (Jackie Fisher days)
 
"Detroyers" as a class of vessel in name unfort are socially unacceptable now, hence the use of Frigate so as to not offend peoples sensibilities

 
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Yimmy       11/27/2007 11:18:21 PM

Has anyone actually managed to destroy an anti-ship missile with 76 mm gun ? Does it work in real life ?




I believe in the Falklands war a Exocet was destroyed by the 4.5 inch gun.
And the Type 21 Amazon class were Frigates.  They were armed with Sea Cat, Exocet, a 4.5 inch gun and full helicopter facilities.  They were perfectly reasonably armed ships given the technology of the day.
 
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