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Subject: CSIRO wins legal stoush with HP
gf0012-aust    4/1/2009 12:26:27 AM
Australias scientific research agency,the CSIRO,has won a crucial multimillion-dollar victory in its protracted international legal battle with the worlds technology giants over royalties for its wi-fi technology. Computer maker Hewlett-Packard has agreed to a confidential settlement with the agency rather than continuing a four-year-old court case against the CSIRO,which contends its patented technology behind wireless computer networks iss potentially worht billions of dollars in royalties. "I can confirm the settlement has been reached with Hewlett-Packard and we have no further comment because of confidentiality and ongoing litigation,"CSIRO spokesman Huw Morgan said yesterday. While the CSIRO would not reveal how much the settlement was worth,it is expected to boost substantially te organizations intellectual property revenue,which reached $81.7 million in 2007-08. The agency is pursuing legal action in the US District Court for the Eastern District of Texas against 13 other international technology companies including Intel,Dell.Toshiba,Netgear,Belkin,SMC,D-LINK,ASUS,Accton,3Com,Buffalo Technology,Microsoft and Nintendo. Hewlett-Packards settlement,which covers any past and future royalties that might have been due to CSIRO,is expected to build pressure on the other companies to settle out of court. The legal costs for the CSIRO are conservatively expected to exceed hundreds of thousands of dollars,but there are high expectations of the long-term rewards to the CSIRO's bottom line. "If successful[in the court cases],CSIRO would earn significant revenue from royalty payments which would exceed the associated legal costs over time,"the federal governments2008-09 budget papers said."At this stage,the revenue and costs are considered unquantifiable,"they said. The CSIRO recovered from a $20.8 million dollar deficit in 2004-05,to record a $47.7 million dollar surplus in 2007-08.
 
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Volkodav       4/1/2009 10:07:09 PM
About time! CSIRO has been producing high grade IP for decades and then seeing little if any return as globals rip them off.
 
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gf0012-aust       4/2/2009 1:12:46 AM
from aunty - only 24hrs late....

Print F" style="font-family: Verdana, 'Lucida Grande', 'Bitstream Vera Sans', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 100%; word-wrap: break-word; color: #0055cc; text-decoration: none; ">Email Share Add to My Stories

CSIRO wins landmark wi-fi settlement

By News Online's Nic MacBean

Posted 32 minutes ago

The CSIRO has won what could be a landmark settlement from Hewlett Packard over the use of patented wireless technology.

The settlement ended HP's involvement in a four-year lawsuit brought by the CSIRO on a group of technology companies, in which the organisation was seeking royalties for wi-fi technology that is used extensively on laptops and computers worldwide.

CSIRO spokesman Huw Morgan declined to elaborate on the details of the settlement, saying: "CSIRO has reached a settlement with HP in relation to wireless technology."

Since the Australian science agency received a patent for its IEEE 802.11a and 802.11g Wi-Fi products in January 1996, the technology has been adopted as an industry standard by most notebooks and desktop computers around the world.

 
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gf0012-aust       4/2/2009 1:20:31 AM
from aunty - only 24hrs late....

Print F" style="font-family: Verdana, 'Lucida Grande', 'Bitstream Vera Sans', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 100%; word-wrap: break-word; color: #0055cc; text-decoration: none; ">Email Share Add to My Stories

CSIRO wins landmark wi-fi settlement

By News Online's Nic MacBean

Posted 32 minutes ago

The CSIRO has won what could be a landmark settlement from Hewlett Packard over the use of patented wireless technology.

The settlement ended HP's involvement in a four-year lawsuit brought by the CSIRO on a group of technology companies, in which the organisation was seeking royalties for wi-fi technology that is used extensively on laptops and computers worldwide.

CSIRO spokesman Huw Morgan declined to elaborate on the details of the settlement, saying: "CSIRO has reached a settlement with HP in relation to wireless technology."

Since the Australian science agency received a patent for its IEEE 802.11a and 802.11g Wi-Fi products in January 1996, the technology has been adopted as an industry standard by most notebooks and desktop computers around the world.

 
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Aussie Diggermark 2       4/4/2009 3:49:37 AM
Excuse my ignorance, but what does this mean exactly?
 
That CSIRO INVENTED wi-fi? 
 
That is a rather large feather in it's cap, if so...
 
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gf0012-aust       4/19/2009 11:15:30 PM

CSIRO notches up more patent wins

By News Online's Nic MacBean

Posted 28 minutes ago

The Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Research Organisation (CSIRO) has had some more wins in an ongoing legal battle over the use of patented Wi-Fi technology.

The government agency has taken on some of the giants of the computing world for what it says is the unauthorised use of its wireless technology.

Since the CSIRO patented the technology in 1996 most computers and laptops in the world have adopted it as an industry standard but there has been no flow of royalties.

It is currently in an American court in Texas, and slowly but surely a stream of companies are opting for confidential settlements.

Three weeks after Hewlett-Packard reached an agreement with the CSIRO, a spokesman has confirmed that Intel, Dell, Fujitsu, Microsoft and Asus have followed suit.

Discussions are continuing with a range of other companies, including Nintendo and Netgear. The details of the settlements are confidential, in accordance with US laws on evidence.

But law experts say the settlements could be a windfall for the CSIRO, because of the scale of the unauthorised use of the wireless technology.

Patent lawyer Neil Shoot says it is clear the CSIRO has a strong case.

"It's difficult to say how much it could end up costing these companies, but as you can imagine it could be quite a large amount if damages get backdated to the unlawful use of the patent," he said.

 
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gf0012-aust       4/22/2009 2:17:58 AM

Patent proceeds to fund new CSIRO research

By News Online's Nic MacBean

Posted 2 hours 47 minutes ago 
Updated 2 hours 41 minutes ago

http://www.abc.net.au/reslib/200812/r323914_1448495.jpg" width="285" height="190" alt="Students work on laptop computers" title="Students work on laptop computers" style="font-family: Verdana, 'Lucida Grande', 'Bitstream Vera Sans', Helvetica, Arial, sans-serif; font-size: 100%; word-wrap: break-word; border-top-style: none; border-right-style: none; border-bottom-style: none; border-left-style: none; border-width: initial; border-color: initial; cursor: url(http://www.abc.net.au/news/img/2007/zoom_in.cur), pointer; " />

Industry standard: the CSIRO's wireless technology is used in computers worldwide. (AAP: Alan Porritt, file photo)




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