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Subject: Warships corner Somali pirates
gf0012-aust    12/4/2007 5:59:51 PM
pulled from ABC Australia h!!p://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2007/12/05/2109900.htm?section=justin ------------------------------------- US and German navy ships have cornered Somali pirates who seized a Japanese-owned chemical tanker more than a month ago, an official has said. The Panama-registered Golden Nori was carrying benzene from Singapore to Israel when it was hijacked on October 28, just off Somalia, one of the world's most dangerous shipping lanes. At the time, US Navy said coalition naval forces had pursued the pirates, opening fire and destroying speedboats the hijacked vessel had in tow. "One German and two American warships have been after Golden Nori for 42 days after it was hijacked. The pirates arrived in Bosasso around 10pm," Saeed Mohamed Rage, Puntland region's fishing and marine minister, told a news conference in the northern port town of Bosasso. In Bahrain, a US Navy spokeswoman said: "We are monitoring the situation after following the Golden Nori since the hijacking." "We continue to encourage the pirates to free the crew and the vessel," said Commander Lydia Robertson. The US Navy, which has had a long presence in the region, is concentrating its anti-piracy efforts along the central coast of Somalia after several ships were hijacked there in recent months, she said. Mr Rage said there were 21 crew members on board. "We are negotiating with their captors. We told them to surrender to Puntland authority," Mr Rage said, adding that the pirates were demanding an undisclosed ransom. "We are in good communications with the Americans and we are still engaged in dialogue with the hijackers," he said. Deprived of central government since 1991, Somalia has gained a reputation for its piracy, despite calls for international action to patrol its waters.
 
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Yimmy       12/5/2007 12:37:21 PM
Part of me thinks one could potentially make a lot of money in piracy.
 
I'm sure you could get an old Ming class sub from China or North Korea and fix it up nicely, then just purchase a container ship to act as 'mother' and to more it against to give the crew a respite, and using inflatable boats with decent outboard motors you could quickly close with any ship, have the choice of the loot and vanish before anyone knew what happened.
 
 
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blacksmith       12/5/2007 8:25:26 PM
How to end piracy.
 
1.  Rope, pirate, tree.  Some assembly required.
 
2.  Q-ships.  Instead of sending $1Billion warships to stand around impotently wringing their hands while the pirates sail booty and captives to safe haven, send small freighters and yachts with SEALs onboard.  Hang money bags over the side for bait.  They fire on it or attempt to force boarding...let your imagination fill in the rest.
 
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WarNerd       12/6/2007 2:36:34 AM

Part of me thinks one could potentially make a lot of money in piracy.
 
I'm sure you could get an old Ming class sub from China or North Korea and fix it up nicely, then just purchase a container ship to act as 'mother' and to more it against to give the crew a respite, and using inflatable boats with decent outboard motors you could quickly close with any ship, have the choice of the loot and vanish before anyone knew what happened.


What purpose does the sub play, or is it just your personal escape vehicle for when a warship shows up?
 
Besides, you probably would not even break even.  The real money in piracy is from ransoming the ship and crew, not grabbing bits of cargo, robbing the crew, or emptying the ship's safe.
 
And if you are going to steal cargo, you will need a fence, who will take the lion's share of the profits, same as any other criminal enterprise.
 
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WarNerd    correction   12/6/2007 2:41:44 AM

How to end piracy.

1.  Rope, pirate, tree yardarm.  Some assembly required.

 
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Jeff_F_F       12/24/2007 10:36:20 AM
I've been thinking that the amphibious warfare ships that the Indian navy is getting could be superb for anti-piracy patrols, being able to serve as a base both for airfraft and for smaller patrol vessels.
 
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Yimmy       12/24/2007 1:29:57 PM



What purpose does the sub play, or is it just your personal escape vehicle for when a warship shows up?

 

Well yeah.

Can't really get away in rubber boats or a freighter.

Position the freighter mothership in common shipping channels, fuel up and send off the sub elsewhere, surface by a random ship, use rubber boats to rapidly board and take what you like, then submerge and sneak back to the mothership.  Your only real expense would be diesel.
 
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RockyMTNClimber    42 days?   12/26/2007 11:19:02 AM
"One German and two American warships have been after Golden Nori for 42 days after it was hijacked.
 
No wonder the Islamo-fascist world thinks we are a bunch of pansies!
 
The only way to stop piracy is to make it's mortality rate 100%. The Germans and the USN certainly have personnel and assets to take down the tanker and free the surviving hostages. 24 hours is plenty of time for the bad guys to surrender or die.
 
Check Six
 
Rocky
 
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dwightlooi       12/26/2007 3:56:43 PM
The one thing I disagree with most rabidly with regard to hostage situations is giving ANY consideration to the hostages' safety. We must completely disregard hostage safety!

Think about it for a minute. The ONLY reason criminals, terrorists and pirates take hostages is the believe that that grants them negotiating power. It is this believe that lead to ALL hostage taking situations. The only appropriate response to hostage situations is to adopt a zero negotiation policy of total and absolute disregard for hostage well being. Once this is made a universal policy and made utterly unambiguous, ALL hostage taking will cease.

In a hostage situation, the hostage takers should only be given two choices. Surrender in 5 seconds and be imprisoned, or do not surrender and be killed along with the hostages -- no exceptions, no trial, no appeals, no time to spend on death row. The only consideration for the hostages is that if they die, their bodies are treated with respect and handed in a dignified manner to their loved ones. The hostage takers on the other hand are ground up in a meat grinder and flushed down the toilet on pay per view. If we had pursued this policy universally since 1945, imagine how many lives would have been saved over the years.

 
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