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Subject: F-35 news thread III
jessmo_24    1/12/2011 7:23:24 AM
BF-2s 1st vertical landing. *ttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VS3ngl1GcaI&feature=player_embedded NAVAIRSYSCOM 10 Jan 2011 "F-35B test aircraft BF-2 accomplishes its first vertical landing and conversion back to normal flight mode at Naval Air Station Patuxent River, Maryland. The integrated test team is testing both the STOVL and carrier variants of the F-35 for delivery to the fleet. Video courtesy Lockheed Martin."
 
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MK       1/18/2011 3:18:05 PM
Merely looks like a summary of what has been previously reported by various sources.
 
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Phaid       1/19/2011 2:23:57 AM
Navy Times is reporting several problems have emerged with the F-35A and B, including flight characteristics, HMD, component reliability, and the previously reported AB "screech".  How's that "bench test and simulate to save money on flight testing" thing working out?
 
New problems disclosed on 2 models of F-35
 
By Dave Majumdar - Staff writer
Posted : Tuesday Jan 18, 2011 17:22:53 EST
. To view the contents go to:" type="hidden" /> http://www.navytimes.com/news/2011/01/military-f-35-report-reveals-new-issues-011811w/" type="hidden" />

The F-35 Lightning II strike fighter has previously undisclosed problems with its handling, avionics, afterburner and helmet-mounted display, according to a report by the Pentagon?s Director of Operational Test and Evaluation.

 Full Story at Navy Times
 
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Shawnc       1/19/2011 3:13:11 AM
When did Singapore announce it was buying the F-35? I didn't get the press release... The last report I saw was this WSJ article that stated the typical and non-commital 'engaged in bilateral discussions' line.
 

The United States is covering 90 percent of the cost of the development but
has participation from Britain, Italy, Turkey, the Netherlands, Canada,
Denmark, Norway and Australia.

Other nations, including Israel and Singapore, have signed contracts to buy the plane.
 
 
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Shawnc       1/19/2011 3:33:52 AM
When did Singapore announce it was buying the F-35? I didn't get the press release... The last report I saw was this WSJ article that stated the typical and non-commital 'engaged in bilateral discussions' line.
 

The United States is covering 90 percent of the cost of the development but
has participation from Britain, Italy, Turkey, the Netherlands, Canada,
Denmark, Norway and Australia.

Other nations, including Israel and Singapore, have signed contracts to buy the plane.
 
 
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Phaid       1/19/2011 9:10:09 AM
Singapore signed a Letter of Intent way back in 2003.  They are a Security Cooperative Participant (SCP), same as Israel, and have contributed about $4 million to its development.
 
So they have not signed any contracts to actually purchase the aircraft but under the circumstances I am not sure the one-liner is totally inaccurate either.
 
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jessmo_24       1/20/2011 12:52:22 PM

Japan leans towards buying F-35 fighter jet: media

Stocks

 
Lockheed Martin Corporation
LMT.N
$77.86
+0.20+0.26%
8:35am PST
http://www.reuters.com/resources/r/?m=02&d=20091123&t=2&i=17201408&w=460&fh=&fw=&ll=&pl=&r=2009-11-23T031852Z_01_BTRE5AM097X00_RTROPTP_0_USA" alt="The F-35 fighter aircraft is seen at Lockheed Martin's production plant in Fort Worth, Texas August 31, 2009. REUTERS/Jessica Rinaldi" border="0" />
 
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Phaid       1/28/2011 9:22:05 AM
Remember that Navy study that estimated the F-35's O&M costs at 30% higher than the legacy Hornet and Harrier?  Remember all the naysayers?  Well...

AF Worries JSF Costs May Soar

Senior Air Force leaders are growing increasingly concerned that Joint Strike Fighter maintenance and operating costs will rise far above previous estimates.

A source familiar with the issue said that the Air Force believes a study performed by the Navy one year ago looks increasingly accurate, based on preliminary data the service has compiled. Buzz readers will remember that the Navy study found the F-35 would cost between 30 percent and 40 percent more per plane than does the current F/A-18 fleet. Since one of the primary goals of the F-35 program, with its web of international partners, was to lower maintenance costs by achieving economies of scale through large program buys by a significant number of countries this would call into question one of the fundamental goals of the program. Another key to achieving those savings was an international PBL contract (Performance Based Logistics). It would spread work share throughout the JSF allies and guarantee greater economies of scale than the U.S. could achieve on its own.

 
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Phaid       1/28/2011 9:22:46 AM
 
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Aussiegunneragain       1/28/2011 9:39:32 PM
I've said it before and I'll say it again. They should have built this thing with an existing avionics suite such as the Super Hornet's. This would have been perfectly adequate out until 2025 and beyond, would have been more suitable for export to a broader range of countries and would have substantially reduced the risk of delays and cost blow outs. Once they had an affordable, stealthy airframe operational in the US and amongst it's allies, they could have gone and built the high-end suite that they are currently designing for the base model, and kept it for the US and select allies.
 
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Phaid       1/29/2011 11:48:47 AM
Here's a nice summary of the F-35 STOVL problems.  Most of them either have a fix implemented or will have, but, again this demonstrates why basing flight testing and IOC milestones on the notion that no problems will be found is guaranteed to fail:
JPO on STOVL F-35 Design Issues

The Joint Strike Fighter program office has provided the detail behind defense secretary Robert Gates' Jan. 6 comment that issues with the STOVL F-35 "may lead to a redesign of the aircraft's structure and propulsion". (You can read AMy Butler's story here.)

There are no surprises on the list. The issues detailed by the JPO have been reported on before, and in most cases fixes are in design or in test. They are: lift-fan clutch heating, driveshaft thermal expansion, roll-post heating, lift-fan doors, bulkhead cracking and pilot-vehicle interface issues.
 
 
 In passing I'd just point out that stuff like this is pretty troubling:
Lift-system prime contractor Pratt & Whitney says the lift-fan clutch and roll-post actuators can get too warm in certain flight conditions "because the environment surrounding the hardware is more demanding than in the original design". Sensors are being installed to monitor temperatures.

Branyan says the problem is heating of the roll-post actuator caused by leakage of hot engine air as the roll nozzle seals age. Insulation is being added. For now, the amount of time the aircraft spends in STOVL Mode 4 (jetborne flight) is being limited.
So they're patching the lift fan and roll-posts with insulation and sensors, not actually fixing the problem itself.  This is how aircraft gain weight, complexity, and maintenance problems.  Tune in next year when we hear how the added insulation is causing water retention and metal corrosion issues.  B models go to sea, remember.
 
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