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Subject: UK headed for economic problems?
EW3    10/29/2006 10:47:51 PM
Opinions on these two stories? Sounds pretty draconian and downright suicidal. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/pages/live/articles/news/news.html?in_article_id=413216&in_page_id=1770&ico=Homepage&icl=TabModule&icc=NEWS&ct=5 http://www.ft.com/cms/s/10e24838-6789-11db-8ea5-0000779e2340.html
 
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Claymore       10/30/2006 12:04:00 AM
just Copy and past the links in, then they will work, don't code them
 
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EW3       10/30/2006 12:09:40 AM
 
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EW3       10/30/2006 12:11:29 AM
 
the links are ok but you have to remove the last few characters after the ".html"  
For some reason it adds a "</div>" if you don't put a space right hafter the link...
 
 
 
 
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Padfoot       10/31/2006 7:15:29 AM
EW3, not sure those reports indicate the UK economy is headed for problems. According to an IMF report the UK economy is doing quite well:

UK's economy grew by 2.8% in Q3

A report issued by the Office for National Statistics in London said that the United Kingdom's economy increased by an annual 2.8 percent in the third quarter, the quickest pace in two years, Bloomberg reported. The report showed that gross domestic product grew 0.7 percent compared to the previous quarter, affected by expansion of service industries and manufacturing.

Rising house prices, record employment and a recovery in manufacturing have pulled the economy back from a slowdown in 2005. An economist at ABN Amro said that in light of the growth and building inflationary pressures, the Bank of England needs to raise interest rates more than once to quell inflation

According to the International Monetary Fund, U.K.'s economy will probably grow 2.7 percent this year, compared with 3.4 percent in the U.S., 2.4 percent in the euro area and 2.7 percent in Japan. It is worth mentioning that the U.K. economy has expanded for 57 consecutive quarters, avoiding the recessions in the U.S., Germany, France and Italy in that period.

There is a lot more good news regarding the UK economy than bad. So I can't see the UK economy heading for problems anytime soon.


 
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EW3       10/31/2006 9:25:42 AM
 
Guess I saw these "taxes" as being rather rough on the economy, they seem very repressive to industry. 
 
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perfectgeneral       10/31/2006 12:14:24 PM
We could do with a rapid house building programme and a tax to put a lid on rising house prices. They threaten to run away with the economy.
 
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lightningtest       11/1/2006 4:53:32 AM

We could do with a rapid house building programme and a tax to put a lid on rising house prices. They threaten to run away with the economy.
I'd settle for a overhaul of planning law so that it is presumed that if you own land you can build a home (only you primary residence mind!) on it.  Furthermore auctions (no-reserve) should be held publicly every 3 to 6  months of all land not-cultivated/coppiced in the last year.  Check that by analysis of satellite/aerial images - suspected land gets a walk over before being listed for sale.  Define public byways to each new block of land as required.  Each new block must leave space for byways around the edges.  That'll change the economics somewhat.

I imagine that a lot of those new houses will be off grid.  Thus builders will find it economic to use high insulation building techniques to keep expensively generated heat in.  Such rural houses would have space around them which people can use for heat pumps, solar panels (the warm water kind), and micro wind/biomass plants.  Water conservation/recycling would become more important and people would have a limited supply (you'd have to dig a bore hole or pay for expensive metered water).  The people living in the houses wouldn't necessarily buy grub in the relatively distant shops but instead get some/most of it delivered by local farm producers - reducing the number of miles food gets shipped marginally.

 Communications have moved on so that many people could do their jobs close to home.  We would be more resilient as a country and people who are not packed together can be more tolerant in times of stress.

 

 
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The Lizard King    What is truly amazing   11/1/2006 12:26:59 PM
is the UK is on pace to pass China as 2nd largest Foreign holder of US Federal Government Public Debt.  In one year, the UK's holdings almost quadrupled.
 
Foreign Financing of US Government Debt
This data comes from the US Treasury - Current as of June, 2006
OWNERSHIP OF U.S. FEDERAL GOVERNMENT PUBLIC DEBT (Billions of USD)
 
 
 
 
June 2006
June 2005
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Japan
 
 
 
635.3
 
667.1
China
 
 
 
327.7
 
298
United Kingdom
 
 
201.4
 
58.8
Oil Exporters
 
 
101.5
 
68.5
Korea
 
 
 
68.9
 
63
Taiwan
 
 
 
 
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Nanheyangrouchuan       11/1/2006 1:09:42 PM
Better to owe to the UK than China
 
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Yimmy       11/1/2006 1:34:04 PM
Perhaps Blair and Bush came to an agreement, whereby it is Bushs turn to play the wife?
 
 
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