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Subject: Guess what maybe the first outer space mining operation
Herc the Merc    12/18/2006 1:32:00 PM
Helium on the moon for fusion reactors.
 
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EW3       12/18/2006 1:48:12 PM
huh?  you been taking science lessons from Nanny again?
 
 
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Herc the Merc    Here EW3---   12/18/2006 1:53:51 PM

Helium-3 is considered a safe, environmentally friendly fuel for candidate for the generators based on fusion reactors, and while it is scarce on Earth it is plentiful on the moon.

"After four-and-half-billion years, there should be large amounts of helium-3 on the moon," said Gerald Kulcinski, a professor who leads the Fusion Technology Institute at the University of Wisconsin at Madison.

Last year NASA administrator Mike Griffin named Kulcinski to lead a number of committees reporting to NASA's influential NASA Advisory Council, its preeminent civilian leadership arm.

The Council is chaired by Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Hagan "Jack" Schmitt, a leading proponent of mining the moon for helium 3.

 
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EW3       12/18/2006 2:28:47 PM
Haven't followed fusion power for quite a while as the field seemed rather static.
Last time I looked fusion power was really about fusing 2 hydrogen atoms.  He-3
has been looked at when fused with Deuterium, but I did not think this has gone
anywhere in terms of practical application though.
Thought this was more or less fantasy for another 50 years.
 
 
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Herald1234    Myth and reality.   12/18/2006 2:46:24 PM
Boron cycle fusion is actually about a decade out, EW3. As for the rest about fusion; as usual you are bullseye accurate. Notice I didn't use the term "dead on"?
 
  
 
Herald
 
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EW3       12/19/2006 1:01:02 AM
Thank you for several reasons Herald!
 
Boron cycle fusion is actually about a decade out, EW3. As for the rest about fusion; as usual you are bullseye accurate. Notice I didn't use the term "dead on"?

 

  

 

Herald



 
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HIPAR       1/29/2007 7:35:18 PM
Have there been breakthroughs in fusion research that I have missed?

The first fusion machine I saw was at Forrestal Laboratory near Princton NJ.  That was back in the sixties.  The current research fusion machines are behemoths that require megajoules in and provide output for a flash. Fusion energy still has the researchers baffled.  But it's good to know we have a source of fuel when they do figure it out.

Does anyone know of a real and documented fusion machine that sustains the reaction?  We all badly need one of those.

---  CHAS

 
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