Military History | How To Make War | Wars Around the World Rules of Use How to Behave on an Internet Forum
Russia Discussion Board
   Return to Topic Page
Subject: the United States is to be portrayed as an enemy
RaptorZ    4/22/2007 1:18:24 PM
As most of us know, the media is a great manipulator, this does not bode well. The Avg Citizen eventually will believe what they hear. ======================= April 22, 2007 50% Good News Is the Bad News in Russian Radio By ANDREW E. KRAMER MOSCOW, April 21 ? At their first meeting with journalists since taking over Russia?s largest independent radio news network, the managers had startling news of their own: from now on, they said, at least 50 percent of the reports about Russia must be ?positive.? In addition, opposition leaders could not be mentioned on the air and the United States was to be portrayed as an enemy, journalists employed by the network, Russian News Service, say they were told by the new managers, who are allies of the Kremlin. How would they know what constituted positive news? ?When we talk of death, violence or poverty, for example, this is not positive,? said one editor at the station who did not want to be identified for fear of retribution. ?If the stock market is up, that is positive. The weather can also be positive.? In a darkening media landscape, radio news had been a rare bright spot. Now, the implementation of the ?50 percent positive? rule at the Russian News Service leaves an increasingly small number of news outlets that are not managed by the Kremlin, directly or through the state national gas company, Gazprom, a major owner of media assets. The three national television networks are already state controlled, though small-circulation newspapers generally remain independent. This month alone, a bank loyal to President Vladimir V. Putin tightened its control of an independent television station, Parliament passed a measure banning ?extremism? in politics and prosecutors have gone after individuals who post critical comments on Web chat rooms. Parliament is also considering extending state control to Internet sites that report news, reflecting the growing importance of Web news as the country becomes more affluent and growing numbers of middle-class Russians acquire computers. On Tuesday, the police raided the Educated Media Foundation, a nongovernmental group sponsored by United States and European donors that helps foster an independent news media. The police carried away documents and computers that were used as servers for the Web sites of similar groups. That brought down a Web site run by the Glasnost Defense Foundation, a media rights group, which published bulletins on violations of press freedoms. ?Russia is dropping off the list of countries that respect press freedoms,? said Boris Timoshenko, a spokesman for the foundation. ?We have propaganda, not information.? With this new campaign, seemingly aimed at tying up the loose ends before a parliamentary election in the fall that is being carefully stage-managed by the Kremlin, censorship rules in Russia have reached their most restrictive since the breakup of the Soviet Union, media watchdog groups say. ?This is not the U.S.S.R., when every print or broadcasting outlet was preliminarily censored,? Masha Lipman, a researcher at the Carnegie Moscow Center, said in a telephone interview. Instead, the tactic has been to impose state ownership on media companies and replace editors with those who are supporters of Mr. Putin ? or offer a generally more upbeat report on developments in Russia these days. The new censorship rules are often passed in vaguely worded measures and decrees that are ostensibly intended to protect the public. Late last year, for example, the prosecutor general and the interior minister appeared before Parliament to ask deputies to draft legislation banning the distribution on the Web of ?extremist? content ? a catch phrase, critics say, for information about opponents of Mr. Putin. On Friday, the Federal Security Service, a successor agency to the K.G.B., questioned Garry Kasparov, the former chess champion and opposition politician, for four hours regarding an interview he had given on the Echo of Moscow radio station. Prosecutors have accused Mr. Kasparov of expressing extremist views. Parliament on Wednesday passed a law allowing for prison sentences of as long as three years for ?vandalism? motivated by politics or ideology. Once again, vandalism is interpreted broadly, human rights groups say, including acts of civil disobedience. In a test case, Moscow prosecutors are pursuing a criminal case against a political advocate accused of posting critical remarks about a member of Parliament on a Web site, the newspaper Kommersant reported Friday. State television news, meanwhile, typically offers only bland fare of official meetings. Last weekend, the state channels mostly ignored the violent dispersal of opposition protests in Moscow and St. Petersburg. Rossiya TV, for example, led its newscast last Saturday with Mr. Putin attending a martial arts competition, with the Belgian actor Jean-Claude Van Damme as his guest. O
 
Quote    Reply

Show Only Poster Name and Title     Newest to Oldest
AdvanceAustralia       4/22/2007 1:39:54 PM
In Russia the government imposes positive news, lacking credibility.

In the West the media themselves impose negative news, lacking credibility.

So the saying goes - No news is good news.

Sad.

 
Quote    Reply



 Latest
 News
 
 Most
 Read
 
 Most
 Commented
 Hot
 Topics