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Weapons: U.S. Navy and the SR25 Sniper Rifle
   Next Article → STRATEGIC WEAPONS: Israel's Flying Anti-Missile System
January
12, 2007: The U.S. Navy is buying more of the SR25 sniper rifle, officially
known as the Mk11 Sniper Rifle System (SRS). This is a 7.62mm weapon based on
the M-16 design (created by retired USAF Colonel Stoner in the 1950s). About
half the parts in the SR25 are interchangeable with those in the M-16. The
Stoner sniper rifle achieves its high accuracy partly by using a 20 inch heavy
floating barrel. The "floating" means that the barrel is attached
only to the main body of the rifle to reduce resonance (which throws off
accuracy.) The semi-automatic, 41 inch long rifle weighs 10.5 pounds without a
scope and uses a 20 round magazine. This is considered the most accurate
semi-automatic rifle in the world. It's popular with Special Forces and
commandos because it allows a good shooter to take out a number of targets
quickly and accurately. The commercial SR25 has a 24 inch barrel, but the navy
wanted a shorter one for better use in urban warfare. The rifle was initially
purchased for Navy SEALS and marines, but is now used by snipers in all the
services, including the navys new infantry force.

Next Article → STRATEGIC WEAPONS: Israel's Flying Anti-Missile System
  

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dll2000       1/12/2007 10:09:12 AM
 
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momus    Is there a civilian version?   1/12/2007 1:42:57 PM
OK, I'll buy one if someone makes a civilian-legal version in the USA--anyone got info on that?
 
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Old Grunt       1/12/2007 1:54:36 PM

OK, I'll buy one if someone makes a civilian-legal version in the USA--anyone got info on that?
It's only been available since 1999.  Any respectable gun shop should be able to help you out.

 
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Yimmy       1/12/2007 2:06:36 PM
I believe there are far better 7.62mm AR15's on the market.  I would suggest asking at snipercentral.com


 
Quote    Reply

Horsesoldier       1/13/2007 9:58:52 AM

I believe there are far better 7.62mm AR15's on the market.  I would suggest asking at snipercentral.com




When we've had them on the range, they seem to do the job just fine.  I'm not sure if a semi-auto gas gun can ever completely rival a good bolt gun for precision, but the SR-25 is a pretty nice piece of work.  (Definitely better than the M14 based alternatives from what I've seen, for whatever that is worth).
 
I would note the Strategy Page write up is, as usual, partly wrong, as the USMC was not one of the initial users of this weapon, but that seems par for the course.
 
Concerning purchasing one, the previous post was correct -- they've been available for years.  You're looking at shelling out several thousand dollars, though, to get the rifle and the military issue (or comparable) optics.
 
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Professor Fickle       1/13/2007 5:51:30 PM
how does this "20 inch heavy floating barrel" work?
does it recoil? or what? 
 
Quote    Reply

Yimmy       1/13/2007 5:54:04 PM

how does this "20 inch heavy floating barrel" work?

does it recoil? or what? 



It just means it is pinned to the action, with no contact with the handguard.

 
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Professor Fickle       1/27/2007 5:56:26 PM
thanks Yimmi
 
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Professor Fickle    Why don't they use this more?   1/27/2007 6:18:07 PM

Nato 7.62 sub-caliber>

Ball Sabot Light Armour Penetrator (SLAP) M948: 5.56 mm tungsten bullet in plastic sabot; 4.02 g; V25 1,220 m/s

Tracer SLAP M959: 5.56 mm bullet in plastic sabot; red trace; 3.82 g; V25 1,220 m/s
 
SLAP sniper: <5.56 mm tungsten bullet in plastic sabot; 3.36 g; MV 1,340 m/s

 

More information>

 

http://www.quarry.nildram.co.uk/highvel.htm

 

One recent development is the reported adoption by the Norwegian Army of a discarding sabot version of the 7.62x51mm NATO round for sniper use. The projectile is understood to be smaller than 5.56mm calibre, and if the comparable 7.62x51mm SLAP (see below) and Remington Accelerator rounds can be used as a guide, muzzle velocity will be in the region of 4,000 fps.

 

another random site >

 

Swedish army snipers have a sub caliber 7.62x51mm round that is used in the the swedish version of the Accuracy International L96A1 AW.. It is a 4,81mm tungsten sabot with a V0 of 1340mps instead of the regular 785mps.. It is Winchester developed and made..

 

Well if you fire it from a sabot you could have very soft or super hard projectile, it wont matter because if wont touch the barrel. And it won’t cause NO barrel damage .

 

Imagine reach out and touch someone at twice the range!  

 
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RockyMTNClimber       1/27/2007 7:05:32 PM


Nato 7.62 sub-caliber>


Ball Sabot Light Armour Penetrator (SLAP) M948: 5.56 mm tungsten bullet in plastic sabot; 4.02 g; V25 1,220 m/s


Tracer SLAP M959: 5.56 mm bullet in plastic sabot; red trace; 3.82 g; V25 1,220 m/s
 
SLAP sniper: <5.56 mm tungsten bullet in plastic sabot; 3.36 g; MV 1,340 m/s


 


More information>


 


link

 


One recent development is the reported adoption by the Norwegian Army of a discarding sabot version of the 7.62x51mm NATO round for sniper use. The projectile is understood to be smaller than 5.56mm calibre, and if the comparable 7.62x51mm SLAP (see below) and Remington Accelerator rounds can be used as a guide, muzzle velocity will be in the region of 4,000 fps.


 


another random site >


 


Swedish army snipers have a sub caliber 7.62x51mm round that is used in the the swedish version of the Accuracy International L96A1 AW.. It is a 4,81mm tungsten sabot with a V0 of 1340mps instead of the regular 785mps.. It is Winchester developed and made..


 


Well if you fire it from a sabot you could have very soft or super hard projectile, it wont matter because if wont touch the barrel. And it won’t cause NO barrel damage .


 


Imagine reach out and touch someone at twice the range!  




Those accelerators will not give you the gild edge accuracy that a conventional custom load will. I have seen them used and they were ok, but not really worth the hype.
IMHO the sniper should use a custom tuned turn bolt and leave the semi-auto to the spotter/backup, but I am pretty old fashioned about these things and I am probably behind the times.
 
Check Six
 
Rocky
 
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