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Sea Transportation: Crew 1, Pirates 0
   Next Article → ATTRITION: High Speed Blackouts Are Deadly
November 13, 2011: Once more, the crew of a ship taken by pirates has fought back and driven the pirates away. In this case the 28 man crew of the 260 ton Taiwanese fishing boat (the Chin Yi Wen) was captured on November 4th while working more than a thousand kilometers from Somalia, in the Indian Ocean. Two days later, the Chinese captain quietly planned an attack which overwhelmed the two armed guards that were holding most of the crew in one room of the Chin Yi Wen. The crew (of Vietnamese, Indonesians and Filipinos) then quickly rushed the other four pirates, who fled to the speedboats and headed back to their mother ship. The first two pirates were tossed overboard as well, and were picked up by their mother ship, which then fled as a British warship approached. Three of the fishermen were slightly injured in the battle, and received medical care from the warship. Then the crew got back to fishing.

Some of these crew rebellions have failed, but most are over quickly one way or the other. Long-range fishing boats are taken not for ransom, but to serve as mother ships. The crews are held for ransom back in Somalia.

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Eagle1    Well, more like crew 1, pirates hundreds   11/13/2011 10:04:02 AM
One crew tossing off one group of pirates should not
start the clock running.
 
Over the period of the increase in Somali piracy, this is
the first instance out of hundreds in which the pirates
not prevail.
 
 
 
Quote    Reply

Thomas       11/13/2011 12:49:44 PM
  Points of interest:
 
It is not the only example of pirates boarding that has been fended off; but yes - it is far from a turning point as such. The problem is that there might be an escalation of method from the pirates.
 
Another thing is - the pirates must be desperate to kidnap from a chinese boat. The Chinese are not liable to pay out ransoms for a Filipino.
 
Thirdly: Fishing that far from the market in China does point to food prices in China.
 
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cwDeici       11/13/2011 1:31:58 PM


One crew tossing off one group of pirates should not

start the clock running.

 

Over the period of the increase in Somali piracy, this is

the first instance out of hundreds in which the pirates

not prevail.

 

 



No ransom for Philipinos: We're not THAT racist (that'd take making a seperate negotiation), but its a concern I admit.
 
As for the above post... there's been significant resistance to piracy, as it was historically, I have some friends who have friends who have fought of pirates back in the 50s and 60s. It's not such an unusual thing.
The thing is to prepare your crew for it.
 
Also I agree there will be an increase in use of force, though that might bring in political repercussions.
 
Personally I'd have tied them in rope and to something heavy before throwing them overboard, consequences be damned and for justice. Well, I'd ask them to repent first.
 
Quote    Reply

cwDeici       11/13/2011 1:33:55 PM
That is asking them to confess their sins and accept the Lord I mean.
 
Also, come to think of it drowning someone is mean, so two shots to the head and then throwing them overboard tied to something heavy sounds more humane.
 
I dunno, I probably wouldn't do it out of concern for my own judicial safety and concern for any family the person might have, but I hope I would.
 
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cwDeici       11/13/2011 1:37:16 PM
Or I dunno, I've heard I can be a carebear sometimes, so maybe I would just throw them overboard (wouldn't do anything radical unless everyone agrees). It's just... rghhhhh, piracy is bad, there's a reason governments were super-harsh on it.

 
Thirdly: Fishing that far from the market in China does point to food prices in China.


Right conclusion, mostly the wrong argument, people fish anywhere they're allowed these days, especially if you're from a big nation that lacks resources, plus the Coast of Aden is pretty close to China in maritime terms.
 
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WarNerd       11/13/2011 2:58:52 PM
The British warship apparently did not bother to pursue or apprehend the pirates.
 
According to the BBC, Taiwan is apparently going to award the Vietnamese sailors who led the counterattack on the pirates, apparently because they were all Vietnam War veteran (no indication of which side).  Wonder if this will lead to an increase in hiring of seamen with suitable past experience in general.
 
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