Article Archive: Current 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014
 Latest
 News
 
 Most
 Read
 
 Most
 Commented
 Hot
 Topics
Procurement: Garage Sale Time In Germany
   Next Article → COLOMBIA: Fighting For Scraps
Defense Security Cooperation Agency

July 11, 2010: The global recession, and its severe impact on some members of the European Union (like Greece), has caused Germany to severely cut military spending. In this case, Germany wants quick cuts, so a lot of expensive equipment is either being retired early, or having procurement cut back. These savings will add up to $12 billion.

The Luftwaffe (German Air Force) is facing the sharpest cuts. Aircraft in general are taking the biggest hits. Most (54 percent) of the 185 Tornado fighters will be retired. The last 37 Eurofighters on order, will be cancelled. Helicopter orders are also being cut, with 42 NH90 transports and 40 Tiger gunships not being procured. The navy will retire 21 Sea King helicopters. Fifteen older Transall transports are being retired and fewer A400M transports being bought.

The navy will retire eight frigates and ten patrol boats. Orders for the new 125 class frigates will be cut from four to three.

The army, which is heavily involved in Afghanistan, will reduce procurement of their new Puma IFVs (Infantry Fighting Vehicles) from 400 to 280. Some of the same cash will be shifted to emergency spending for equipment needed by the soldiers in Afghanistan.

 

 

Next Article → COLOMBIA: Fighting For Scraps
  

Show Only Poster Name and Title     Newest to Oldest
Nasty German Idiot       7/11/2010 12:32:44 PM
Wow wow wow -  this is a list of possible cuts now beeing evaluated by an Army commission.
 
Nothing is sure at this stage.   The Puma for example will very likely be ordered in the full number (400), they are to replace thousands of Marders and 280 vehicles is not enough for the job.  Highly unlikely that these will be cut.
 
The Tornado fleet cut is relatively sure, because it was planned anyway and now will happen some years earlier. 
 
Quote    Reply

Nocturne       7/11/2010 4:30:57 PM
hmm and how about Eurofighters?
 
Quote    Reply

Nasty German Idiot       7/11/2010 7:22:20 PM
Im not sure, buy any cuts in number of both the Eurofighter or A-400M orojects will lead to severe treaty penalties. The discussion is not new in Germany. Im not sure if we can really save any money there. 
 
Quote    Reply

Skylark       7/15/2010 2:07:36 AM
     I wonder what it costs to keep a Panavia Tornado flying versus the Eurofighter Typhoon?  Swing-wing designs have been out of date ever since fighters started using relaxed stability and fly-by-wire technology, and all that mechanical wing-pivoting hardware and software must take a lot of man-hours to maintain.  If the Typhoon is easier and cheaper to maintain than the Tornado, then Germany should be acquiring more of the new design and retiring the Tornados while they still have some value on the second-hand market.  As a ground attack aircraft, the Tornado is still formidable, and nations like India would be happy to have them as replacements for their worn-out Mig 27s.
 
Quote    Reply

WarNerd       7/15/2010 4:08:15 AM

     I wonder what it costs to keep a Panavia Tornado flying versus the Eurofighter Typhoon?  Swing-wing designs have been out of date ever since fighters started using relaxed stability and fly-by-wire technology, and all that mechanical wing-pivoting hardware and software must take a lot of man-hours to maintain.  If the Typhoon is easier and cheaper to maintain than the Tornado, then Germany should be acquiring more of the new design and retiring the Tornados while they still have some value on the second-hand market.  As a ground attack aircraft, the Tornado is still formidable, and nations like India would be happy to have them as replacements for their worn-out Mig 27s.

The decisions are being driven by short term cost considerations.  Maintenance costs for the Typhoon are lower and would be less costly in the long run, but not enough to offset the purchase cost of new aircraft within, say, 5 years.  The decisions are being made based on what gives them the maximum bang per buck over the next 3-5 years, by which time we will hopefully be out of the recession.  Then hopefully more funds will be available to purchase new/replacement aircraft (and if you believe that I have a bridge for sale http://www.strategypage.com/CuteSoft_Client/CuteEditor/Images/emwink.gif" alt="" />). 
 
Quote    Reply