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Air Defense: New Russian Naval Suite
   Next Article → PROCUREMENT: A Perfect Storm Of Incompetence, Corruption And Pressure From Above
July 30, 2011: The Russian Navy is replacing its Kortik autocannon/missile systems with a navalized version of the similar Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft system. Both systems use high-volume 30mm cannon, and longer range missiles, to destroy incoming aircraft and anti-ship missiles. The Kortik system was developed at the end of the Cold War, and entered service in 1992. The Pantsir-S1 anti-aircraft system entered service (with the Russian Air Force) last year. Pantsir-S1 was supposed to be ready three years ago, but there were more technical problems. There's been a pattern of that with Pantsir-S1. Development began in the 1990s, but was sporadic for nearly a decade because there was no money.

Pantsir-S1 is a mobile system, each vehicle carries radar, two 30mm cannon and twelve Tunguska missiles. The 90 kg (198 pound) missiles have a twenty kilometer range, the radar a 30 kilometer range. The missile can hit targets at up to 8,400 meters (26,000 feet). The 30mm cannon is effective up to 3,200 meters (10,000 feet). The vehicle can vary, but the most common one carrying all this weighs 20 tons, and has a crew of three. Each Pantsir-S1 vehicle costs about $15 million. 

The naval version eliminates the vehicles, adds more waterproofing and vibration resistance. Pantsir-S1 is more effective and reliable than the older Kortik systems.

 

Next Article → PROCUREMENT: A Perfect Storm Of Incompetence, Corruption And Pressure From Above
  

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Thomas    Why?   10/15/2011 1:46:19 PM
With Excalibor the gun range is 80 km. Så why attack with aircraft so clos?
Anyway - what is the range from which a GPS bomb can be dropped?
 
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WarNerd       10/16/2011 3:26:21 AM
With Excalibor the gun range is 80 km. Så why attack with aircraft so clos?
Anyway - what is the range from which a GPS bomb can be dropped?
GPS guided munitions are only as good as your targeting information. If your target point is off by 20 meters and the guided round is accurate to 4 meters, then you would be better off firing dumb rounds that are only accurate to 50m, because one of them might get lucky and hit the target but unless the guidance fails the GPS rounds never will. For the same reason GPS rounds are considered worthless against moving targets.
 
The solution is to use laser guided rounds but that requires a designator with a direct line-of-sight, usually at a range of less than 12km if it is the aircraft. Of course, since the target will most likely be hidden, camouflaged, and/or mixed with decoys, you may have to get a lot closer than that to be able to figure out where or which the target is.
 
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Thomas    Negative WarNerd   10/16/2011 8:31:30 AM
Nope! The trick is to get the precise target information.
 
That can be done in a couple of ways:
 
1) Force the enemy to move predictably.
a) Make a narrow channel so lateral movement is neglectable.
b) Impose maximum speed: Which in shallow water is a given thing.
c) My personal favourite: Hit them at anchor - or in lieu of that - secured to the pier.
 
2) Spot them from shore.
 
 
 
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WarNerd       10/17/2011 4:24:51 AM
Nope! The trick is to get the precise target information.
 
That can be done in a couple of ways:
 
1) Force the enemy to move predictably.
a) Make a narrow channel so lateral movement is neglectable.
b) Impose maximum speed: Which in shallow water is a given thing.
c) My personal favourite: Hit them at anchor - or in lieu of that - secured to the pier.
 
2) Spot them from shore.
Those ideas will work, but what do you do if you cannot catch the enemy in a harbor?
 
In a harbor is typically the only times most warships will be subject to a narrow channel (or narrow enough to make a difference), maximum speed limits or water shallow enough to enforce them, or forced to move in an extremely predictable manner when under fire.
 
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Thomas    Precisely   10/17/2011 11:43:14 AM
Which means that with little effort you can keep them in port.
 
You cannot always be so lucky that the enemy cannot sail - as is the case with Swedes.
 
Look at the Russian Baltic Fleet - no matter what - it will never be able to break out into the open sea.
 
But that is strategy: How to make the enemys position hopeless in the first place. Might persuade him to give up nefarious designs to begin with. The best warship is the one that never needs to fire a gun in agner.
 
The best admirals never fight a battle.
Kofoed-Hansen  was a mining specialist - locked the Danish straits during the entire World War 1.
Vedel even sank his own fleet.
Wang plans to never let them out of harbour - or alternatively catch them in thick ice.
 
Jutland was the biggest blunder og the Royal Navy.
Japan was a bit more difficult in WW2 very, very hard to deny access to the sea.
 
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